Featured past event:
2015 Annual ANU Reconciliation Lecture

Each year, a renowned Australian individual is invited to speak publicly on the topic of reconciliation. In 2015, the lecture was given by The Honourable Mr Kevin Rudd.

» read more

<strong>Featured past event:</strong> <br />2015 Annual ANU Reconciliation Lecture

Featured past event:
‘Repatriation stories from a far away land’

A public lecture by NCIS Adjunct Fellow Dr C. Timothy McKeown, a legal anthropologist whose research focuses on the development and implementation of repatriation policy.

» read more

<strong>Featured past event:</strong> <br />‘Repatriation stories from a far away land’

Featured past event:
Graduate research retreat

NCIS hosts an annual workshop for Higher Degree by Research (HDR) scholars who are Indigenous to Australia, or are undertaking research into indigenous topics.

» read more

<strong>Featured past event:</strong><br />Graduate research retreat

Featured past event:
Justice Reinvestment Forum

2 August 2012: NCIS co-hosted a 1-day discussion forum with academic and government leaders, about issues related to Justice Reinvestment.

» read more

<strong>Featured past event:</strong><br />Justice Reinvestment Forum

Featured past event:
Common Roots: Common Futures conference

20 – 22 February 2012: NCIS co-hosted a 3-day conference and workshop at the University of Arizona, focusing on national and international Indigenous governance and development.

» read more

<strong>Featured past event:</strong><br />Common Roots: Common Futures conference

Events

16
Dec
2015

ARC funding: A bluffers' guide

NCIS Research Manager, Douglas Macnicol, will be running a workshop on the fundamentals of Australian Research Council (ARC) funding for the benefit both of those who are new to the game and those who do not yet know all about it. HDR scholars, in particular, will be very welcome. Doug is proposing to cover:

  • what you can request from the ARC (overview)
  • definition of some key terms
  • major schemes, with a focus on Discovery Projects, Discovery Indigenous, DECRA and Linkage Projects
  • selection process
  • what makes a good application
  • what support is available if you are submitting an application
  • questions answered.

Time & venue: 2 – 3pm, Level 3 meeting room, John Yencken Building, ANU campus.

Enquiries: email Ms Marleya Isua.

15-16
Dec
2015

Serving Our Country: Community Yarn Up

Led by Professor Mick Dodson, the project ‘Serving Our Country: a history of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the defence of Australia’ will document the contributions of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in defence and auxiliary services from the Boer War until 2000. The research team will record oral or video accounts of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men and women who served and family members to better understand their histories of defending country. The research team are also keen to see service-related photos, postcards and other memorabilia.

Come and share your own story of defence service, or that of relatives who served, and help us tell the history of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people’s participation in the defence of Australia.

Time & venue: 10am – 4pm, Canberra at AIATSIS, 51 Lawson Crescent, Acton.

Enquiries: Visit the event page Canberra Community Yarn Up or contact Ms Allison Cadzow or phone 0402 741 832/6125 0931.

30
Nov
2015

Justice Reinvestment and incarceration in the ACT

Australia spent $3.2 billion on incarceration in 2013-14.

The burden of incarceration falls heavily on Indigenous families and communities: from 2000 to 2010, Indigenous prisoner numbers increased by 85% compared with 35% for non-Indigenous. Indigenous Australians make up 28% of the adult Australian prisoner population and are 14 times more likely to be imprisoned than non-Indigenous people. An Indigenous person aged 10-17 years is almost 15 times more likely to be under supervision on any given day than a non-Indigenous young person.

Five years after opening, the Alexander Maconochie Centre reportedly needs a $54 million extension, signifying that the ACT is not immune from the expansionary pressures in other Australian jurisdictions. While ACT has Australia’s lowest incarceration rates, its incarceration pattern mirrors other jurisdictions in over-representation of Indigenous prisoners (Australian Bureau of Statistics reports that as of 2013, it was 16%; more accurately, currently it is over 25%). As elsewhere, ACT's prisoners are commonly from low socio-economic neighbourhoods.

An innovative policy idea that is gaining traction in Australia is Justice Reinvestment (JR). JR can be conceived of as both a philosophy for justice reform and a set of strategies that seek to examine incarceration spending, so that funds that might have been spent on incarceration are instead reinvested into health and social interventions that reduce offending in the socio-demographic groups and communities that disproportionately contribute to prison populations. The idea springs from an understanding that over-incarceration impacts communities in ways that perpetuate cycles of crime. As a systems-based approach, JR encompasses a comprehensive range of service provision areas such as health, housing, employment, justice, family support, mental health and alcohol and other drug use services. It impels policymakers to consider the implications of current punitive policies that result in higher levels of incarceration, particularly of Indigenous Australians, and how funding could instead be directed towards addressing the social determinants of incarceration.

Join Professor Mick Dodson, Institute for Governance and Policy Analysis (IGPA) Professorial Fellow Mr Jon Stanhope and Australian journalist and commentator Mr Jack Waterford as they explore JR and consider how funding could be directed towards addressing the social determinants of incarceration.

Time & venue: 12 – 1.30pm, Members' Dining Room, Old Parliament House.

Enquiries & RSVP: via Eventbrite or contact Communication & Events Officer Ms Elle Grady or phone 02 6201 2074. Refreshments provided at 12 noon.

11
Nov
2015

The 2015 Annual ANU Reconciliation Lecture

Each year, a renowned Australian is invited to speak publicly on the topic of reconciliation. The 2015 lecture will be given by The Honourable Kevin Rudd, who served as Australia’s 26th Prime Minister (2007-2010, 2013) and as Foreign Minister (2010-2012).

Time & venue: 6 – 7pm followed by refreshments; Arc Cinema, National Film and Sound Archive, 1 McCoy Circuit, Acton, ACT.

Enquiries & RSVP: The event is free and open to the public. Registration is essential. For further details, please contact the NCIS Centre Administrator, Ms Tamai Heaton, on ncis@anu.edu.au or 6125 6708.

» read more

30
Oct
2015

ILA/NCIS Seminar: The International Law Context of Recent Developments in Indigenous Policy in Australia

The particular aspect of Indigenous policy of immediate concern is the attempt to discourage and possibly shut down remote discrete Aboriginal communities. This push by Government was exemplified by threats by the WA Government to shut down a large number of communities, Mr Abbott’s ‘lifestyle choices’ comments in regard to such communities, and the controversy that has followed. Whilst most the attention has been on WA, SA is also affected and in the NT the Commonwealth has followed a policy of centralisation of communities and under-resourcing of small and medium sized communities for a decade. No new housing has not been built on small to medium sized Aboriginal communities for over 10 years leading to an increasingly dilapidated and overcrowded housing stock. There is indirect coercion on Aboriginal people to leave their homelands communities and move to large settlements or urban areas.

Prof Dodson, Mr Greg Marks, Dr Sean Kerins will address the implications of Australian domestic policy of international instruments to which Australia is a party or has endorsed.

Time & venue: 5 – 7pm, Hedley Bull Centre Lecture Theatre 1

Enquiries & RSVP: via Eventbrite or contact NCIS Centre Administrator Ms Tamai Heaton or phone 02 6125 6708. The event is free and open to the public, refreshments included.

19-23
Oct
2015

NCIS writing retreat

NCIS staff and Higher Degree Research (HDR) scholars participate in an annual week-long writing retreat at the Kioloa Coastal Campus of ANU. The week is loosely structured with a primary focus on writing, and with opportunities for discussion, sorting out knotty writing problems, and enhancing writing skills.

Time & venue: Kioloa Coastal Campus located on the NSW south coast.

Enquiries & RSVP: Please email the NCIS Deputy Director, Associate Professor Cressida Fforde.

15-16
Oct
2015

Graduate research retreat

NCIS is proud to host its sixth retreat for Higher Degree Research (HDR) scholars undertaking research into Indigenous topics. The retreat is an opportunity for Indigenous HDR scholars and scholars researching in Indigenous studies to engage in intellectual discussion, networking and information sharing.

Time & venue: Burringiri Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Culture Centre, Yarramundi Reach, 245 Lady Denman Drive, Canberra.

Enquiries & RSVP: Please email the NCIS HDR Program or phone 02 6125 0160. The event is free and places are limited.

» read more

27
Aug
2015

Kenneth Myer Lecture 2015: Professor Mick Dodson

Promoting positive change in Australia

Professor Mick Dodson AM delivers the 2015 Kenneth Myer lecture on a topic close to his heart. Drawing on years of community and government engagement, Mick Dodson will offer his thoughts on creating social change and solidarity for our country.

Time & venue: 6 – 7pm, Theatre foyer, ground floor, National Library of Australia, Parkes Place, Canberra.

Enquiries & RSVP: This lecture is free (bookings are recommended) and will include refreshments. Booking enquiries 02 6262 1271 (Mon – Fri 9am – 12pm).

25
Aug
2015

Veronica Fynn – ‘Gender violence and the "Rule of Law": Indigenous communities in Australia and post-war Liberia’

In accordance with University rules, Higher Degree by Research (HDR) scholars must complete a pre-submission seminar three to six months prior to the intended submission of their dissertation. The seminar generally includes the research project's major objectives, content and results, and the work's conclusions. Scholars are expected to demonstrate their independent command of the material, their ability to communicate clearly and concisely the analysis of the material and findings, and their ability to respond appropriately to constructive comment and criticism.

» read more about Veronica's research project

Time & venue: 10 – 11.30am, Level 3 meeting room, John Yencken Building, 45 Sullivans Creek Road, ANU campus.

Enquiries & RSVP: Please contact the NCIS HDR Program or phone 02 6125 0160. The event is free and open to the public.

29
Jul
2015

Ed Wensing and Dr Sharon Harwood – ‘Emerging disjuncts between land use planning and native title: The make or break on Indigenous economic development’

NCIS PhD scholar, Mr Ed Wensing.

There are some worrying disjuncts emerging between native title and land use planning. These disjuncts can be identified in three areas. The first area is procedural. Planning is as much about process as it is about allocating land and environmental uses. The procedural disjunct is about the continuing failure of state and local planning authorities to properly engage with native title holders about their rights, interests, values, needs and long term aspirations with respect to land use. The second area is substantive. Planning is about substance and land use outcomes. The substantive disjunct is the emerging mismatch between native title holders rights, interests, values, needs and long term aspirations with formal planning documents, especially at regional and local scales, such that native title holders are being unduly constrained in exercising and achieving their longer term aspirations through their native title rights and interests. The third area is decision making. The point at which native title holders are being required to enter into ILUAs as part of consent determinations does not always coincide with the point at which state and local planning authorities are preparing or reviewing their statutory land use plans. What this means is that native title holders are entering into ILUAS when they may not have had the opportunity to undertake their own internal land use and occupancy planning as a consequence of having achieved positive outcomes from their native title claims, and the ILUAS may constrain their longer term aspirations.

This seminar will focus on a parcel of land in the Mapoon Aboriginal Shire on Cape York Peninsula to demonstrate in a practical sense how these disjuncts are playing out in relation to land use planning and native title rights and interests. We argue that further careful research is required to develop a better understanding of what is happening and how the synergies between native title processes and land use and environmental planning can be improved.

Time & venue: 12.30 – 2pm, Rm 2145 (Jon Altman Room), Lvl 2, Copland Building #24, Kingsley Place, ANU campus.

Enquiries & RSVP: Centre Administrator, Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research, 02 6125 0587 or email caepradmin.cass@anu.edu.au.

22
Jul
2015

Myles B. Mitchell – ‘The Esperance Nyungars, at the frontier’

Archaeological investigation of mobility, communication and identity in late-Holocene Aboriginal society, Western Australia

NCIS PhD scholar, Myles Mitchell.

In accordance with University rules, Higher Degree by Research (HDR) scholars must complete a pre-submission seminar three to six months prior to the intended submission of their dissertation. The seminar generally includes the research project's major objectives, content and results, and the work's conclusions. Scholars are expected to demonstrate their independent command of the material, their ability to communicate clearly and concisely the analysis of the material and findings, and their ability to respond appropriately to constructive comment and criticism.

Abstract

This thesis documents the results of an Aboriginal community-based archaeological research project in the Esperance region of southern Western Australia. The research was conducted as part of a knowledge exchange between the researcher and the Esperance Nyungar community. The study investigates the role of two important cultural places Belinup and Marbaleerup, and how they functioned within regional patterns of movement that underpinned Aboriginal society and economy in this region during the very late-Holocene. The research explores concepts of identity (Jones 1996; Meskell and Preucel 2004) relating to local Esperance Nyungar people, and neighbouring Ngadju and Mirning people who occupied the lands to the north and east of the study area. At a larger scale it explores identity in relation to the broader Nyungar and Western Desert cultural blocs, which intersect at the edge of Esperance Nyungar country. This forms the basis of an analytical discussion of the historical construction of contemporary Esperance Nyungar identity.

» read more about Myles' research project

Time & venue: 2.30 – 3.30pm, Level 3 meeting room, John Yencken Building, 45 Sullivans Creek Road, ANU campus.

Enquiries & RSVP: Please contact the NCIS HDR Program or phone 02 6125 0160. The event is free and open to the public.

24
Apr
2015

HDR scholar masterclass: Yi ethnic minority Bimox

Inspiration, music, ceremonial practice and popular culture in South West China

The diversity and characteristic of Yi ethnic minority people's music has traditionally been stimulated by themes of love, fear, blood and sweat but predominately by the chants and sounds of the Yi Ritual Specialists – the Bimox, during ceremonial practices that embroil ancestral spirits. Inspiring a distinctive folk culture, the Bimox have been the subject of Yi people's songs, dances, operas and instrumental pieces that are, until today, performed during festivals, weddings, banquets, mourning ceremonies etc. The various musical expressions are traditionally educational in content, with lyrics pertaining to the origin of the universe, evolution, ancestral migration, heroic stories and customary law, or to the nature of agricultural labour and love. Since the 1980s, Yi music, dance and song has been much appreciated all over China for its depth, elegance and grace and has become positively entwined in the promotion and dissemination of mother tongue language.

This Higher Degree by Research (HDR) scholar masterclass will introduce the various genres of traditional Yi music and practice, illustrating how Yi music has become embedded in mass popular culture due to its spirit and poise.

Professor Ap Kup Vyt Vy is the Dean of the Yi Ethnic Minority Research Centre in the South West University for Nationalities in Chengdu, the People's Republic of China. He is an acclaimed ethnic minority poet, a literary critic and an educationalist. He was born in Labu Ezhuo, Liangshan Yi Autonomous Prefecture in Southern Sichuan province. He is a staunch advocate of mother tongue language learning and has published widely on the subject, both in academic journals and via his poetry.

Time & venue: 2 – 4pm, Level 3, John Yencken Building, 45 Sullivans Creek Road, ANU campus.

Enquiries & RSVP: Places are limited to Higher Degree by Research (HDR) scholars. Please contact the NCIS Centre Administrator, Ms Tamai Heaton on ncis@anu.edu.au or 6125 6708.

23
Apr
2015

Round-table discussion: Professor Ap Kup Vyt Vy

'Conscientious quests in China's ethnic minority higher education sector: expanding the focus from Yi mother tongue language to a major in Yi medicinal science'

Chaired by Dr Asmi Wood.

In recent years, China's ethnic minority higher education policies have become a significant component of China's overall development strategy. Intricately entwined with China's broader objectives of equality, social harmony, stability and unity, they have contributed to the education and training of countless minority cadres and students across the nation. For the last half a century, Sichuan's South West University of Nationalities (SWUN) in Chengdu has played a significant role in this higher education initiative, chiselling unique educational pathways for its 55 ethnic minorities. This lecture will focus on one of SWUN's minority departments – the Yi Ethnic Research Centre, which was founded in 1952. The Centre's primary focus for the past 60 years has been on the teaching and learning of Yi language and literature. Courtesy of governmental support, it has recently founded its first scientific major – Yi medicinal science. Although traditional Yi medicine is a highly sophisticated knowledge system amongst Yi people, this is the first time that this course is to be taught in any mainstream Chinese university to date. It is a positive mission in China's ethnic minority higher education sector.

This lecture will initially outline the history of Yi medicine, and then undertake an analytical reflection on the administration and management of the new course which is comprehensively linked to the entrepreneurial sector. The lecture will elucidate the aspirations, opportunities and challenges administrators encounter in both the educational and private sector. The lecture will conclude with a discussion on the channels for international collaboration for the research enhancement of traditional Yi medicinal science, thought and practice.

Professor Ap Kup Vyt Vy is the Dean of the Yi Ethnic Minority Research Centre in the South West University for Nationalities in Chengdu, the People's Republic of China. He is an acclaimed ethnic minority poet, a literary critic and an educationalist. He was born in Labu Ezhuo, Liangshan Yi Autonomous Prefecture in Southern Sichuan province. He is a staunch advocate of mother tongue language learning and has published widely on the subject, both in academic journals and via his poetry.

Time & venue: 11am – 12pm, Ross Hohnen Room, Chancelry Building, 10 East Road, ANU campus.

Enquiries & RSVP: The event is free and open to the public. Places are strictly limited and registration is essential. Please contact the NCIS Centre Administrator, Ms Tamai Heaton on ncis@anu.edu.au or 6125 6708.

22
Apr
2015

Public lecture: Professor A Guut Zza Mot

Evolutionary shifts in Yi ethnic minority painting in South West China

Delivered in Chinese with English translation.

Outside of Yi cultural circles, the origins of Yi ethnic minority people in South West China is largely still unknown. Yi people are believed to have originated from Zhaotong in present-day Yunnan Province and migrated to Liangshan in Southern Sichuan over 2200 years ago. During this historical migratory period, the Yi ritual priests – 'the Bimox' – left behind exceptional etchings, rock paintings, spirit depictions and ghost boards. These artistic expressions are the key to understanding the origin, migratory patterns, culture and spirit of Yi people in South West China. Contemporary Yi art still contains these fundamental patterns and artistic depictions, present not only in paintings, but also in architecture, instruments and costume.

This lecture will firstly travel back in time to Zhaotong, examining the first etchings of Bimox culture and its migratory artistic patterns, moving on to a discussion of the Bimox spirit pictures and ghost boards, and finally progressing to an exhibition of contemporary Yi painting which is now forming an imperative part of China's extensive ethnic minority cultural heritage and pride.

Painting by Professor A Guut Zza Mot.

Professor A Guut Zza Mot is of Yi heritage. He was born in 1955 in a traditional Yi mountain village in Liangshan Autonomous Prefecture, South Sichuan Province, China. Experiencing the bitterness of struggle and poverty from an early age, he learnt to channel his creative energy through the medium of art. In 1979, Professor A Guutt Zza Mot was accepted into Art School in Chongqing's Xinan University, from which he graduated and began a teaching career in the field of contemporary Yi art and culture. In recent years, Professor A Guut Zza Mot has been hailed as the father of Contemporary Yi painting with exhibits both in Mainland China and Hong Kong. He is currently the Director and Senior Researcher of the Liangshan Yi Municipal Art Studio in Liangshan Autonomous region, Southern Sichuan Province.

Presented by the ANU National Centre for Indigenous Studies and School of Art, ANU College of Arts & Social Sciences.

Time & venue: 1 – 2pm, School of Art lecture theatre, Level 1, 105 Childers Street, ANU campus.

Enquiries & RSVP: The event is free and open to the public. Registration is essential via Eventbrite. Further details are available from the NCIS Centre Administrator, Ms Tamai Heaton on ncis@anu.edu.au or 6125 6708.

21
Apr
2015

Public lecture: Professor Ap Kup Vyt Vy

Cultural entanglements: connections between Yi ethnic minority ritual specialists (the Bimox) and modern poetry in South West China

Delivered in Chinese with English translation.

Yi ethnic minority Bimox are ritual specialists of the highest Shamanic degree. Their traditions and ideologies are at the heart of Yi people's spiritual world. Their historical narrative, performance and ritual entwine the living to the dead, the past to the present, the word to the soul; they are integral to the spiritual health and well-being of the Yi people. In addition to their role as spiritual mediators, they are the protectors of oral tradition and the creators of Yi script, embodying entirely the history, philosophy and knowledge of the ancients. Embellishing the spirit and the soul of the Yi, today, Bimox scripts are still the life force of Yi language, inspiring creative patterns in art, literature, and poetry.

In this lecture, introduction of the Bimox will be followed by an analysis of the nexus between the Bimox and the aesthetics of modern Yi poetry. The lecture will be accompanied by readings of poetry in Yi and English languages and will conclude with a recital of Professor Ap Kup Vyt Vy's renowned poem Zhyx ge ax lu yyr kut('Calling back the soul of Zhuge Alu').

Professor Ap Kup Vyt Vy is the Dean of the Yi Ethnic Minority Research Centre in the South West University for Nationalities in Chengdu, the People's Republic of China. He is an acclaimed ethnic minority poet, a literary critic and an educationalist. He was born in Labu Ezhuo, Liangshan Yi Autonomous Prefecture in Southern Sichuan province. He is a staunch advocate of mother tongue language learning and has published widely on the subject, both in academic journals and via his poetry.

Presented by the ANU National Centre for Indigenous Studies and ANU China Institute.

Time & venue: 5.30 – 7pm, Auditorium, Australian Centre on China in the World, Fellows Lane, ANU campus.

Enquiries & RSVP: The event is free and open to the public. Registration is essential via Eventbrite. Further details are available from the NCIS Centre Administrator, Ms Tamai Heaton on ncis@anu.edu.au or 6125 6708.

17
Apr
2015

Sophia Close – ‘Indigenous knowledge systems, development and conflict – A case study of Timor-Leste’

In accordance with University rules, Higher Degree by Research (HDR) scholars must complete a pre-submission seminar three to six months prior to the intended submission of their dissertation. The seminar generally includes the research project's major objectives, content and results, and the work's conclusions. Scholars are expected to demonstrate their independent command of the material, their ability to communicate clearly and concisely the analysis of the material and findings, and their ability to respond appropriately to constructive comment and criticism.

» read more about Sophia's research project

Time & venue: 9 – 10.30am, Phillipa Weeks Library, Level 2, ANU College of Law, 5 Fellows Road, ANU campus.

Enquiries & RSVP: Please contact Ms Tamai Heaton via email (NCIS Centre Administrator) or telephone 02 6125 6708. The event is free and open to the public.

2
Apr
2015

Annie Te One – ‘Māori involvement in international relations: an analysis of foreign policy in relation to Māori identity.’

NCIS PhD scholar, Ms Annie Te One.

In accordance with University rules, Higher Degree by Research (HDR) scholars must complete a Thesis Proposal Review (TPR) before the end of the first year of their candidature. The TPR forms a significant component of the scholar's first annual report and generally includes the subject of their proposed research, the methodology to be employed, an analysis of the relevant literature on this topic, a description of how the scholar's proposed research will make an original contribution to the study of this subject, and – where relevant – an outline of the fieldwork required for the scholar's research program.

» read more about Annie's research project

Time & venue: 12 – 1.30pm, Level 3 meeting room, John Yencken Building, 45 Sullivans Creek Road, ANU campus.

Enquiries & RSVP: Please contact Ms Tamai Heaton via email (NCIS Centre Administrator) or telephone 02 6125 6708. The event is free and open to the public.

25
Mar
2015

Public seminar: 'Reducing incarceration by testing Justice Reinvestment theory and methodology: an exploratory case study'

Researchers from ANU are working with the Cowra, NSW community on a community-driven research project which explores the theory and research methodology of Justice Reinvestment (JR) as a way of reducing incarceration of juveniles.

The research is being conducted by an inter-disciplinary team and is being guided by a Research Reference Group comprising representatives of the Cowra Shire Council (Mayor, Deputy Mayor and General Manager), representatives from the Cowra Aboriginal Land Council, the President of the NSW Children's Court, an ANU-based human rights lawyer and a US-based JR academic.

Several community workshops and forums have been held over the past 12 months: in Cowra, members of the local police, the Police Citizens Youth Club (PCYC), judiciary, education, health and mental health workers, and practitioners in community service and non-government sectors have worked together to develop a locally relevant and appropriate questionnaire and recruitment process for inviting local young people to self-refer to the research. The young people's involvement in the research is aimed at exploring issues of concern to them and to build a case for obtaining services or resources that may help prevent young people from coming into contact with the criminal justice system.

In keeping with the participatory action research design, continuous consultations with community members has occurred throughout the research, ensuring that the community is involved in decisions that empower its members to explore alternatives to incarceration for their young people. At a broader level, the research will potentially result in findings and recommendations for addressing the high levels of young people in contact with the criminal justice system, through developing a place-based JR-informed model.

The keen support for this community-driven research project by the Cowra community has been exemplified through regular local media reports documenting the project's progress.

This presentation will be given by NCIS Research Fellow Dr Jill Guthrie as part of the Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research (CAEPR) Seminar Series 1 2015.

Time & venue: 12.30 – 2pm, Wednesday 25 March; Room G058, Hanna Neumann Building, 21 University Avenue, ANU campus.

Enquiries & RSVP: The event is free and open to the public. Please contact the CAEPR Administrator on (02) 6125 0587 or caepradmin.cass@anu.edu.au for further details.

Updated:  24 January 2017/ Responsible Officer:  NCIS Project Coordinator/ Page Contact:  NCIS Administrative Officer